Predicting Plant Diversity Response to Disturbance: Applicability of the Intermediate Disturbance Hypothesis and Mass Ratio Hypothesis
  • 【DOI】

    10.1080/07352689.2013.791501

  • 【摘要】

    Predicting the relationships between disturbance, biodiversity and productivity of ecosystems continue to preoccupy ecologists and resource managers. Two hypotheses underpin many of the discussions. T... 展开>>Predicting the relationships between disturbance, biodiversity and productivity of ecosystems continue to preoccupy ecologists and resource managers. Two hypotheses underpin many of the discussions. The Intermediate Disturbance Hypothesis (IDH), which proposes that biodiversity peaks at intermediate levels of disturbance, is often extended to predict that productivity follows the same response pattern. The Mass Ratio Hypothesis (MRH) proposes that the biological traits of the dominant species are the critical drivers of ecosystem function (e.g., productivity) and that these species increase in biomass rapidly after disturbance then stabilize. As a consequence, species diversity first peaks then declines after disturbance as a few species dominate the site. Both provide a conceptual link among disturbance, species diversity and productivity (an index of ecosystem function). We assessed the current state of empirical support for these two hypotheses with a literature survey and determined if their conformance is related to ecosystem type or site productivity. Conformance of IDH reported in past reviews (considering all ecosystems) ranged from 16 to 21%. This contrasts with our finding that in terrestrial ecosystems conformance to IDH was 46% (22 of 48 studies), 17% studies reported non-compliance, and 23% reported inconclusive results. Most studies explained their results with respect to IDH or MRH. Only two studies were specifically designed to test the validity of IDH or MRH. We conclude that (i) the IDH is mostly applicable to predict species diversity response to disturbance in upland sites of medium to high productivity and the MRH is applicable to organic sites of low productivity; (ii) there is a critical need for more studies specifically designed to test these hypotheses in natural ecosystems using common protocols; and (iii) enhanced understanding of these models will add value in refining management policies and in the selection of meaningful diversity indicators of sustainability. 收起<<

  • 【作者】

  • 【刊期】

    Critical Reviews in Plant Sciences 2013年6期

  • 【语种】

    eng