Fast but ephemeral effects of ecological restoration on forest beetle community.
  • 【摘要】

    Many protected areas have a long history of human intervention before being protected. In protected forests, the past land use has reduced the amount of natural structures, which are crucial substrate... 展开>>Many protected areas have a long history of human intervention before being protected. In protected forests, the past land use has reduced the amount of natural structures, which are crucial substrates for thousands of species. We evaluate the short-term ecological effect of forest restoration (dead wood creation) on conifer-associated saproxylic (dead-wood dependent) beetles. More specifically, we analyze the effect of dead wood creation on the number of beetle species and individuals 1 and 5 years after restoration in spruce and pine forests, using a large-scale monitoring network over Finland. The number of saproxylic beetle species and individuals was larger at restored than at control plots both 1 and 5 years after restoration in both spruce and pine forests. Community composition in restored plots was different from control plots 1 year after restoration, but had returned towards the control plot composition 5 years after restoration, while control plots remained largely unchanged. Both in spruce and pine forests, there were more red-listed and rare saproxylic beetles in restored than in control plots 1 and 5 years after restoration. Our results indicate that restoration has an overall positive influence on saproxylic beetle diversity immediately after dead wood creation, but this effect is rather short-lived. Long term monitoring of restored dead wood is crucial in investigating successional pathways as well as biotic communities in advanced decay stages, and in fully evaluating the ecological effect of dead wood creation as a forest restoration measure. 收起<<

  • 【作者】

    Komonen, A.  Kuntsi, S.  Toivanen, T.  Kotiaho, J. S. 

  • 【刊期】

    Biodiversity and Conservation SCI 2014年6期

  • 【语种】

    eng