Food shortages and international agricultural programs
  • 【摘要】

    The most recent data indicate an unconscionable 842 million people are chronically hungry in the world, 94 percent in developing countries. India, China, and other Asian countries that were the center... 展开>>The most recent data indicate an unconscionable 842 million people are chronically hungry in the world, 94 percent in developing countries. India, China, and other Asian countries that were the center of concern over hunger in 1960 have been among the most successful at increasing food production and consumption. Current food shortages, both chronic and acute, are concentrated in sub-Sahara Africa. There, production has lagged behind needs and fluctuations from natural and human-caused disasters have generated recurring food shortages and need for food aid. Three elements played critical roles in Asia and are likely to be the key to solving food shortages in Africa: rural/agricultural economic growth that generated increased incomes for the rural poor, stability of food prices, and non-agricultural economic growth. U.S. universities have educated many of the agricultural scientists in developing countries and those at CGIAR centers. The international agricultural programs of U.S. universities that have been important in maintaining links between U.S. and foreign institutions and in facilitating the training of developing country scientists need continued financial support. 收起<<

  • 【作者】

    Herdt RW 

  • 【刊期】

    Critical Reviews in Plant Sciences SCI 2004年6期

  • 【语种】

    eng