Origin of Salts and Brine Evolution of Bolivian and Chilean Salars
  • 【DOI】

    10.1007/s10498-008-9056-x

  • 【摘要】

    Central Andes in Bolivia and northern Chile contain numerous internal drainage basins occupied by saline lakes and salt crusts (salars). Salts in inflow waters stem from two origins: alterati... 展开>>Central Andes in Bolivia and northern Chile contain numerous internal drainage basins occupied by saline lakes and salt crusts (salars). Salts in inflow waters stem from two origins: alteration of volcanic rocks, which produces dilute waters, and brine recycling, which leads to brackish waters. Chilean alteration waters are three times more concentrated in average than Bolivian waters, which is related to a higher sulfur content in Chilean volcanoes. Brackish inflows stem from brines which leak out from present salars and mix with dilute groundwater. Most of the incoming salts are recycled salts. The cycling process is likely to have begun when ancient salars were buried by volcanic eruptions. Three major brine groups are found in Andean salars: alkaline, sulfate-rich, and calcium-rich brines. Evaporation modeling of inflows shows good agreement between predicted and observed brines in Chile. Alkaline salars are completely 收起<<

  • 【作者】

  • 【刊期】

    Aquatic Geochemistry 2009年1-2期

  • 【语种】

    eng